Sunday, June 29, 2014

Census Sunday – Davis Brumfield in MS


Davis Brumfield 1795 SC – 1863 MS
 son of John & Margaret (Kelly) Brumfield;
 married to Cynthia Holmes


1850 US Census, MS, Pike, Police District #2
Davis Brumfield, 55 b SC; farmer; $800 value
Cynthia, wife,44 b GA
Children: Elijah, 24 b LA, farm hand; John, 20 b MS, student; William, 17 b MS, student; Emily, 16 b MS; Eveline & Angeline, 11 b MS; Elisha, 10 b MS; Isaac K., 7 b MS; Jesse, 5 b MS; Louisa, 3 b MS

1860 US Census, MS, Pike, Holmesville
Davis Brumfield, 65 b SC; farmer; $2,000 & $20,000 value
Cynthia, wife, 56 b GA
Four children, all b MS: Elisha, 21, farmer; Isac, 17, farmer; JAC, 15, farmer; LT, 14.


Friday, June 27, 2014

NGS Exhibit Hall Purchase: Marion County, Mississippi, Miscellaneous Records

The Exhibit Hall was filled with genealogy research tools, tips and aids. I wish I had had
more time to explore there. The three days I was there was not enough to hear all the sessions and still explore the Exhibit Hall. When I found this book at Southern Historical Press and saw the author I picked it up quickly. If E. Russ Williams has written a book that includes an area where your family lived you will want to read it.



Williams, E. R. (2002). Marion County, Mississippi, Miscellaneous Records. Greenville, S.C.: Southern Historical Press. (Original work published 1986).

Containing Orphans Court Records; 
Wills and Estates, 1812 – 1859; 
Deeds, 1812 – 1840;
Territorial and Federal census Records and Mortality Schedules; 
Old Road Books;
1813 Lawrence County Tax Lists


This book has many references to my Brown family. Moses Brown, 1777 – 1838, was my 4th great grandfather in my father’s direct line. He married Sarah Robertson, daughter of Christian Robertson.[1] They lived in Georgia but after her death in 1810 he moved his children and his mother in law to Mississippi.[2] We find him there as early as the 1813 MS Census for Marion County. Some of the collected data in this book is a repetition of data I already had and some of it is new. I can’t say I understand all the implications. It looks like Christian Robertson, who I originally thought was a man, was Moses’ mother in law and she had mental health issues. In 1819 Moses was, understandably, appointed her guardian. In 1820 he made an inventory of her estate [which I would love to track down]. 

The next year Moses was appointed guardian of Edward S, James G & Sarah Brown, his own children. [Oldest daughter, Christina was married.] Isn’t a father automatically the guardian of his own children? Is it because they inherited from the estate of Christian Robertson? Each year he reported to the courts on the account of that estate. Somewhere between 1819 & 1823 she died and Moses gave a final accounting, showing that he owed the estate $109. 

Then, in 1824, William Fortenberry, son in law of Moses, became the guardian of Edward S Brown. Why was Moses no longer the guardian of his own son?

These are the entries from the Marion County Book that relate to the Browns:

1819. The sheriff of Marion County is ordered to summon 12 men to examine the intellectual ability and mental capacity of Christian Robertson. Witness by Honorable Benjamin Lee, county judge of the Orphan Court, April, 1819. The men appointed for above: John Warren Senior, John Warren Junior, John Smart, Solomon Warren, Daniel Buckhalter, Fleming Tynes, Thomas Smith, Thomas Futch, Samuel Prekins, William Warren, Philomon Terrell, Robert Stacy. Recorded May 14, 1819. Orphan Court Record Book A, page 88.

Bond: Moses Brown, James Stewart, and Pilomon Terrell are bound unto Benjamin Lee, county judge of the Orphan Court, in the sum of $10,000. Dated June 28, 1819. Brown was appointed guardian to Christian Robertson, non compitus mentus. Recorded July 3, 1819 by James Phillips, recorder of Orphan Court.Orphan Court Record Book A, page 89.

Ruling by the twelve select men that Christian Robertson was a lunatic. Moses Brown was appointed guardian. Dated June 28, 1819. Recorded June 28, 1819. Orphan Court Record Book A, page 90.


1820. Inventory of the estate of Christian Robertson, a person of non compus mentus (including slave and other property). Taken by Moses Brown, guardian. He swears it is truthful on the 28th day of August, 1820. Recorded June 14, 1821. Orphan Court Record Book A, page 110.

1821. Edward S Brown, James T Brown and Sarah Brown are declared minors. Guardianship granted to Moses Brown and he is to make issue of their estates. Dated September 24, 1821, recorded September 24. Orphan Court Record Book A, page 136.

Bond: Moses Brown, John Warren, Junior and William Fortenberry are bound to Ransom M Collins, county judge of the Orphan Court, for the sum of $5000. Dated September 24, 1821. Moses Brown is to be the guardian to Edmond S Brown, James G Brown, Sarah Brown. Recorded September 24, 1821. Orphan Court Record Book A, page 136 & 7.

1822. Account of the estate of Christian Robertson by Moses Brown, guardian. Dated September 28, 1822; recorded October 29, 1822. Orphan Court Book A, page 212 – 213.

1824. Account of the estate of Edward S Brown, James Brown, Sarah Brown, minors, with Moses Brown, guardian, for year 1822. Recorded January 28, 1824. Orphan Court Record Book A, page 266 – 267.

Ordered that the Inventory of the estate of Christian Robertson as rendered in by Moses Brown her guardian be received and that the same be committed to record. [between 1819 – 1823]

c1824. Inventory of estate of Edward S Brown, James G Brown, and Sarah Brown, minors, children of Moses Brown, by William Fortenberry, guardian. Orphan Court Record Book A, page 310 – 311. [c 1825]

Noble W Harris presented a will importing to be the last will and testament of Christian Robertson deceased and Moses Brown one of the subscribing witnesses thereto came into court and being examined on oath said that he fully believed and was confident that the said Christian Robertson at the time of making said will was not of sound mind and memory and incapacitated to transfer property by will: on which testimony the Court rejected said will. [between 1819 – 1823]

The final account current on the Estate of Christian Robertson, late a lunatic, of this county with Moses Brown, her guardian - - Having been examined audited and reported for allowance at this term and due proof of notice being given by the guardian as required by law - - and no exception being made thereto - - It is therefore Decreed by the court that the said current account be finally allowed, and that this Decree together with said account current be made a part of the Record of Guardianship - - and that said Guardian stand chargeable to said Estate in the sum of one hundred and nine dollars Seventy one, or shown by striking balance on said account. [between 1819 – 1823]

1824. Bond: William Fortenberry, John Smart, Isaac Fortinberry, and Ansel Powell are bound to James Phillips for 41333.33. Dated September 27, 1824. Wm. Fortenberry is guardian to Edward Brown. Recorded December 24, 1824. Orphan Court Book A, page 298.



This volume of miscellaneous records includes other Brown family information like tax lists and records of cattle marks and brands.

It also includes information on my Brumfield & Fortenberry families. Your family might be in these records also. Pick up a copy and check the index.


[1] Criminger, Adrianne Fortenberry. The Fortenberry Families of Southern Mississippi. South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1984.


[2] Potter, Dorothy Williams. Passports of Southeastern Pioneers 1770 - 1823. Reprint. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1990.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #25; Edward S Brown in GA & MS


This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we “write once a week about a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, a research problem — any that focuses on that one ancestor.”



Edward Stewart Brown
b 26 July 1806 GA 
My 3x great Grandfather



There were at least three Edward Browns among my early Browns:

· Edward Brown, Sr. b c 1730 – d c 1797 NC, possibly the son of Hardy Brown
· Edward Brown, Jr b c 1775, son of Edward Brown
· Edward S Brown b 1806 GA – d 1856 MS, son of Moses Brown

When working on this line I proceed carefully to keep them straight. The middle initial is a great help in identifying my 3x great grandfather. [There were also 2 Moses Browns and an Allen Moses Brown but let’s not get into that now.]

Edward S Brown was the son of Moses Brown & Sarah Robertson. His siblings were: Christina, James G. & Sarah Brown.[1] He also had half siblings.

Edward was born in Liberty, Georgia but he did not stay there long. By 1810 his mother had died[2] and his father moved the family to Mississippi[3] where he married again[4] and had more children. By 1813 the Moses Brown family was established in Marion County, MS.[5]

Edward S Brown married Mary Polly Spurlock who was born 1 January 1800 In Georgia. They had five children: Allen Moses, Mary Magdelene, Martha M., Adeline V. and James Pascal; all born in MS. By 1840 the family was in Amite County, MS where Edward had purchased three parcels of land totaling 153 acres in the Robinson Creek area.[6], [7] In 1850 his land was valued at $720.[8]

I do not have a primary source for the death of Edward S Brown but reliable family histories show his death as 7 May 1856 MS.[9] However, the Bureau of Land Management shows that Edward Stewart Brown made a second investment in land on 1 June 1859 when he purchased two parcels of land. Was there another Edward S Brown or was my 3x great grandfather still alive?

In 1860 Mary Brown was the head of the family. Her two sons were with her but not her husband, Edward.[10] It is most likely that he had died by this time but had he died in 1856 or after the 1859 land purchase?


 
1859 Land Patent for Edward Stewart Brown



[1] Criminger, Adrianne Fortenberry. The Fortenberry Families of Southern Mississippi. South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1984.
[2] Criminger, Adrianne Fortenberry. The Fortenberry Families of Southern Mississippi. South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1984.
[3] Potter, Dorothy Williams. Passports of Southeastern Pioneers 1770 - 1823. Reprint. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1990.
[4] Upton, Mrs. Robert Chester. Marriage Records Marion County, Mississippi 1812 - 1860. 1958. 976.221 1812 Marriage record of Moses Brown & Nancy Perkins Aug 7, 1812. Consent by James Perkins, father. Bondsman John Smart.
[5] Williams, E. Russ. Marion County Mississippi Miscellaneous records, 1812 - 1859. Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1986. 976.221. Names of Persons with Taxable Property 1813. Moses Brown, property: 1 pole; 1 slave.
[6] Boyd, Gregory A. Family Maps of Amite Co, MS. Deluxe. Norman, OK: Arphax Publishing Co., 2006.
[7] US Dept. of the Interior; Bureau of Land Management; MS State Volume Patent, Accession #MS0440-.55
Patent issued 10 Nov 1840 to Edward Stewart Brown; section 17; 153.39 acres.
[8] 1850 US Census, MS, Amite Co; Roll M432-368.  Line 30. E S Brown family.
[9] Criminger, Adrianne Fortenberry. The Fortenberry Families of Southern Mississippi. South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1984.
[10] 1860 US Census, MS, Amite, Liberty; M653-577, National Archives. Mary Brown and children.

Monday, June 23, 2014

Amanuensis Monday – 1901 Letter from a Friend

An Amanuensis is a person employed to write what another 
dictates or to copy what has
been written by another. Amanuensis Monday is a daily blogging theme from Geneabloggers which encourages the family historian to transcribe family letters, journals, audiotapes, and other historical artifacts. Not only do the documents contain genealogical information, the words breathe life into kin – some we never met – others we see a time in their life before we knew them.




This letter was written to my great grandmother, N Regina Gruissy while she was away from Ohio, visiting her sister in Michigan. It was addressed to RFD #2, St. John’s, Clinton Co., MI. Her friend, Bessie Kaufman, used a two cent stamp to send the letter to Regina.

It is a delightful letter from one young woman to another, talking about singing, sewing & young men.


Sept 25 – 1901
Doylestown O.

Miss Regina,
Dear friend it is with pleasure to sit down and write to you. I received your letter a short time ago and was very glad to learn that you were among the living yet. I will forgive you for not writing because you ask me to you know. Oh gee I wish you were out here. I am having lots of fun now. I am not working just now. I quit my place last week. I am staying at my cousins in Doylestown but expect to go home Sat eve and stay a week or so. I wish you would be at home then we would go to No 10 Singing again. Bertha is at home this week getting some sewing done. I hope you are enjoying your self out there. I had it in my head of going to Iowa this winter but gave it up on account of a certain person that objects.
Well as I am getting tired & sleepy and the rest are all asleep I must close with a kind Good Night. From Your Ever Faithful friend Miss Bessie Kauffman, Doylestown. Ans Soon

Excuse Mistakes
And Blunders
For when it rains
It Sometimes thunders
Amen.

The boys are all as pretty & sporty as ever, ha. ha. ha.
Ans Soon       Sooner          Soonest

Written upside down on the bottom of the letter:

In the golden chain of friendship, regard me as a link.

Sunday, June 22, 2014

Sunday Obituary – Irene Bankston Smith of Bogue Chitto


Irene B. Smith in MS

"Irine Bankston Smith daughter of Levi and Jane Bankston, born March 17, 1859, married Wyatt R. Smith, Dec. 21, 1871. She united with Bogue Chitto Baptist Church June, 1873, moved her membership to Pleasant Hill in 1881, and moved back to Bogue Chitto in 1887, died April 12th, 1914. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. E. M. Schilling, who baptized her about 40 years ago. She was among the first to unite with Bogue Chitto church after its constitution."

Williams, E. Russ. Abstracts of Obituaries from the Minutes of the Magee's Creek Baptist Association (Mississippi and Louisiana), 1882 - 1924. Monroe, Louisiana: Privately printed, 1978, page 73. From the Louisiana Archives, Baton Rouge, LA. 



1 Irene Bankston b: 17 Mar 1859, d: 12 Apr 1914
... + Wyatt Rankin Smith m: 21 Dec 1871
......2 Fannie Rebecca Smith b: 1881, d: 21 Jan 1923
...... + Isaac Omer Cutrer b: 1871 Pike, MS, m: 2 Feb 1898, d: 31 Jan 1941
.........3 George Washington Cutrer b: 24 Oct 1899, d: Nov 1977
......... + Josephine Fanara
.........3 Fleet Rankin Cutrer b: 8 May 1902, d: Jan 1978
......... + Mildred Maeola Bauds m: 24 Mar 1929
.........3 Ollie Lee Cutrer b: 11 Oct 1903, d: Oct 1996
......... + Laura Lee m: 25 Nov 1930
.........3 Onice Odwell Cutrer b: 10 Aug 1911 Osyka, Pike, MS
......... + Malinda McBrayer b: Cullman, AL, m: 6 Jun 1931, d: 14 Nov 1967 FL
......... + Fernanda Osma Gregg
.........3 Isaac Omer Cutrer b: 15 Nov 1913, d: 21 Mar 1995 in Foley, Baldwin, AL
......... + Dorothy m: 27 Dec 1933
.........3 Nellie Louise Cutrer b: 1917, d: 6 Mar 1989
......... + J. D. Miller m: 04 Jul 1936, d: 1973 in Mt. Hermon, LA


Friday, June 20, 2014

My Great Great Grands

I have just finished posting about all my great great grandparents through 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. It is a good time to compare & analyze.

My father’s great grandparents:

Allen Brown                       1836 – c 1870                      33 years  [Accidental Death]         
Emmaline Smith                 1834 – 1920                         88 years

Jessie Brumfield               1838 – 1914                         75 years
Martha Alford                   1846 – unknown

William Mark                      1844 – 1904                         60 years
Elidia R Ritter                    1854 – 1912                         58 years

Augustus Gruissy                1840 – 1915                         75 years
Esther B Wolf                      1836 – 1906                         70 years              


Average age = 66

They were all born in a 23 year span & died in a 45 year span.

Because Allen Brown drown as a young man the average life span becomes low. If you look at my father's grandparents & parents, his side of the family is clearly the longer lived.

My mother’s great grandparents:

Patrick Coyle                      1841 – 1925                         84 years
Margaret Brady                 c1855 – 1934                       79 years

Daniel Mullane                  1838 – 1930                         92 years
Brigid English                    1848 – 1920                         72 years

Average Age = 82

They were all born in a 17 year span & died in a 14 year span.


These are all on my mother’s mother’s side of the tree because I have no information on her father’s side. This limited information probably means there is no statistical significance but it is still interesting.




Thursday, June 19, 2014

NGS Conference Exhibit Hall Purchase: Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills

As I have written, Maia’s Books was a vendor at the conference
 that was filled with books.
Once I found the PA section I started to fill my arms with books. This is the last of those books:




Wright, F. E. (2009). Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1749-1819.
 Westminster, MD: Heritage Books.

Introduction: 
These wills were abstracted under the auspices of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in the early 1900s. Copies were made available to various libraries in Pennsylvania and microfilm copies made by the Genealogical Society of Utah (LDS). Originally the abstracts were arranged in alphabetical order. In this version we have re-arranged the entries in chronological order.



I found my 5th great grandfather, Johann Jonas Wolf, b 1739 PA – d 1787 PA, with reference to his wife and children. I had read a previous mention to this will in: Young, Henry James. Genealogical Reports for The Historical Society of York County: Evidences of the Wolf Families of York County before the Year 1850, 1938. From York County Heritage Trust, 250 East Market Street, York. My list of things to do includes finding a copy of this will.

Sep 7, 1787 Sep 21, 1787

Wolf, Jonas. Executors: Henry Hull and Garret Dorland. Berwick Township. Wife; Appolonia Wolf. Children: Jacob, John, Appolonia, Catherine, Adam, Christianna, Frederick, Elizabeth and Andrew.



I also found a 5th great granduncle, Christian Dick and his wife, Catherine Naugle/Nagle.

Oct 19, 1771 Oct 29, 1771

Nagle, John. Executors: Mathias Bowser and William Mummer. Paradise Township. Wife: Catharine Nagle. Children: John, Jacob, Margaret wife of William Hart, and Catherine and Christian Dick.


There are also several more references to the Wolf/Wolff family. I would like to be able to tie them in to my York Co Wolf family but the details just don’t line up as yet.

Do you have family in the area? Would you like a quick look up? Let me know.


Tuesday, June 17, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #24; Brigid English, Irish Mother of 11

This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we “write once a week about a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, a research problem — any that focuses on that one ancestor.”


Brigid English Mullane

b c 1848 Waterford, Ireland – 
d 28 November 1920 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland

My Great Great Grandmother
Brigid English Mullane


Brigid English was the daughter of Martin English & Ellen Hogan. She had a sister named Mary who married David Pollack. Mary & David had two children.

Brigid’s father, Martin, was a carpenter on Main Street in Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland. Daniel Mullane was the son of Thomas Mullane who was also a carpenter there. In 1866 Brigid & Daniel, the children of the carpenters, were married in old Saint Mary’s Church in Clonmel.[1] Daniel and Brigid Mullane raised a large family in Clonmel on the shore of the tranquil River Suir. They lived on Mary Street and attended old Saint Mary’s Church. Later they changed to the newer Saints Peter and Paul Church. Many of their children were baptized there.

Daniel Mullane was a coach builder in Clonmel.[2]  By the early 1900s Daniel, Brigid and their family moved to Upper Gladstone Street. Many businesses, including Daniel’s coach building business were established on the street.

I do not know any stories that tell me what kind of person Brigid was; rather she was kind or stern, timid or bold. I do know that Brigid dealt with much tragedy. She was the mother of 11 children and she lived through the deaths of six of those children. Two sons and two daughters died as little children. The first tragedy happened on 9 December 1872, when Thomas, not yet two years old, died from bronchitis.[3] We can only imagine the heartbreak the family suffered at the death of the little toddler. The second son to die was Patrick. On 29 August 1881, tragedy again struck the family when this 12 year old son died from dysentery.[4]

Two daughters, both named Margaret, also died as children. The first Margaret Mullane was born in 1876.[5] On 18 April 1880 the second Margaret was born to Daniel and Brigid Mullane.[6] We may wonder why the Mullanes would give two daughters the same name. Although there is no death record as proof I believe the first Margaret died and another daughter was given the name of her deceased sister. It was the custom in our family to name children after deceased family members. On the 22 July 1892 this second Margaret died at age 12.[7]

Two daughters died as young adults. Evidence seems to show that Catherine Mullane was a Sister of Mercy Catholic nun and died as a 22 year old.[8]  Daughter, Julia Mullane, wife of Timothy J Horgan and the mother of two children, died in 1918 at the age of 32 years. She died from Influenza. Her husband remarried and I have been unable to track down Julia’s children.[9]

I am sure that Brigid always remembered each of those children who died before reaching old age. Two of the other five children emigrated to the United States and lived in New York City. Mary Josephine left Ireland from Queenstown [now called Cobh] on the S. S. Britannic, part of the White Star line, crossing the Atlantic Ocean and arriving in New York City on 25 May 1885.[10] She married and raised her family in New York City. She did return to visit her Irish family at least once. Frances Mullane also left Ireland for New York. She became a nurse there; serving in both World Wars.[11], [12] Frances traveled between New York and Ireland several times to visit her family in Clonmel.

Three children of Daniel & Brigid Mullane remained in Ireland: Timothy, Ellen and Daniel, Jr. All three remained unmarried.

Brigid English Mullane died on 28 November 1920.[13]

Death of Mrs. Mullane, Clonmel. We regret to announce the death of Mrs. Bridget Mullane, wife of Mr. D. Mullane, coach painter, Upper Gladstone street, Clonmel, which occurred on Sunday. Deceased had been ailing for some weeks and, despite the best medical care and loving nursing, she gradually grew worse and passed peacefully away fortified by the rites of holy Church, of which she was a practical and devout member. The remains were removed to SS. Peter and Paul’s Parish on Monday night. On Tuesday Requiem Mass was offered for the repose of her soul Rev. W. Walsh being celebrant. The funeral took place to Newcastle where internment took place in the family burial ground. The chief mourners were – Mr. D. Mullane (husband); Mr. Timothy Mullane, Mr. D Mullane (sons); Miss Ellie Mullane (daughter); Mr. T. J. Horgan (brother in law); Miss B English and Miss Ciss English (cousins). There was a large attendance of the general public.[14]



Brigid, Daniel & Family
1 Daniel Mullane b: c 1838 in Kanturk, Cork, Ireland, d: 25 Mar 1930 Clonmel, Ireland
... + Brigid English b: c. 1848 in Waterford, Ireland, m: 25 Aug 1866 in Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d:
28 Nov 1920 in Clonmel, Ireland
......2 Mary Josephine Mullane b: 03 Aug 1867 in Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 17 Dec 1927 Bronx, NY
...... + Michael Coyle b: 24 Nov 1870 Moate, Ireland, m: 09 Nov 1895 NY, d: Unknown
......2 Patrick Mullane b: 17 Mar 1869 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 29 Aug 1881 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland
......2 Thomas Mullane b: 25 Dec 1870 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 9 Dec 1872 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland
......2 Timothy Mullane b: 27 Apr 1872 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 30 Aug 1963 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland
......2 Ellen Mullane b: 18 May 1874 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 17 Jun 1965 Clonmel, Tipperary,
Ireland
......2 Margaret Mullane b: 17 Apr 1876 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 9 Mar 1877 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland
......2 Frances Bridget Mullane b: 06 Apr 1878 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: Apr 1946 NY
...... + Franklin Keeton
......2 Margaret Mullane b: 18 Apr 1880 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 22 Jul 1892 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland
......2 Daniel Joseph Mullane Jr. b: 18 Mar 1882 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 4 Feb 1969 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland
......2 Julia Mullane b: 1 Mar 1885 in Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: 1918 Ireland
...... + Timothy J. Horgan b: Abt. 1885 Ireland, m: 03 Mar 1916 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: Aft. 1920
......2 Catherine Mullane b: 8 Feb 1887 Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, d: Bef. 1911



[1] Marriage Record for Daniel Mullane and Bridget English, 25 August 1866, Clonmel, Register 3, Entry 186; Bru’ Boru’ Heritage Center, Rock of Cashel, Cashel, County Tipperary, Ireland.  
[2] Business Card belonging to Daniel Mullane, Clonmel, Ireland. 
[3] Death Record for Thomas Mullane, 9 December 1872, Clonmel Parish, Register #7, Entry #462, Bru’ Boru’ Heritage Center, Tipperary, Ireland. 
[4] Death Record for Patrick Mullane, 29 August 1881, Clonmel, Register 13, entry 452; Bru’ Boru’ Heritage Center, Rock of Cashel, Cashel, County Tipperary, Ireland.
[5] Birth and Baptismal Record for Margaret Mullane, April 1876, Clonmel Parish: Register 9, Entry 50; Bru’ Boru’ Heritage Center, Tipperary, Ireland. 
[6] Baptismal Record for Margaret Mullane, 18 April 1880, Saints Peter and Paul Parish, Clonmel, Ireland; Waterford Heritage Survey, Jenkin’s Lane, Waterford, Ireland.
[7] Death Record for Margaret Mullane, 22 July 1892, Clonmel, Register 20, Entry 261; Bru’ Boru’ Heritage Center, Rock of Cashel, Cashel, County Tipperary, Ireland.
[8] Civil Death Record for Catherine Mullane, 2 August 1900; Tipperary, Ireland;  Roots Ireland.
[9] “Interview with Kathleen G. Coyle” (Kathleen G. Coyle, Sun City West; Arizona), by author, 5 - 9 August 2000.
[10] New York Passenger Lists 1820 – 1957, Microfilm #M237-486, List #616; S. S. Britannic, arrival 25 May 1885.  Passengers: Mary Mullane and Mary A. Pollack.
[11] Letter from Lt. Colonel Bert W. Caldwell (War Department, Office of Surgeon General, Washington) to Frances Mullane (440 East 26th Street, New York City, New York) 9 July 1918.
[12] Letter from Chairman, Ruth G. Hall. RN (War Manpower Commission, 353 Broadway, Albany, New York) to Mrs. Frances Keeton, RN (Metropolitan Hospital, Welfare Island, New York) 5 September 1944.
[13] Pedigree Chart for Kathleen Coyle prepared by Kathleen Coyle.
[14] "Death of Mrs. Mullane, Clonmel." Nationalist [Clonmel] 04 Apr 1920.

Monday, June 16, 2014

Amanuensis Monday - 1901 Letter from Mom

From Geneabloggers: Amanuensis Monday is a daily blogging theme which encourages the family historian to transcribe family letters, journals, audiotapes, and other historical artifacts.

'Tonic' made by Augustus C Gruissy
This letter was written to my great grandmother, N. Regina (Gruissy) Mark 1879 OH – 1959 OH while she was in Michigan visiting her sister, Rephenia Gruissy Nichols and her husband, Willis Nichols. The Nichols and their son moved to Michigan in late 1900 or early 1901 from Ohio.

This was written by Esther Barbara Wolf, Regina’s mother. Esther [1836 PA – 1906 OH] was the daughter of John Franklin Wolf & Elisabeth Burkholder. Esther was 65 when she wrote this letter. In the letter she repeatedly asks her daughter to return home to take care of herself and her husband.

This letter is full of misspellings and grammatical errors. The pages of this letter have no punctuation. Some periods have been added to make the reading easier. Each paragraph below is a new page. It looks like Esther wrote these pages over a series of days.


To: Miss Regina V. Gruissy, RFD No. 2, St. John’s, Clinton Co., Michigan
From: Esther B. (Wolf) Gruissy, RFD North Lawrence, OH
Postmarked: 4 September 1901

Dearest Dauter [daughter] I set myself to anser [answer] your kind and much welcome letter wich [which] we ware [were] glad to here [hear] from you that you are well But sory [sorry] to here [hear] that Willas [Willis][1] is not well and seth [Seth][2] is not well. Pap[3] is not well. His hands is so Bad. i am pretty well now. hoping this may find youns all well now. pap said i should tell you to tell willis that if he wants som [some] medsen [medicine] he will send him if he pays the Expres [sic] on it. See how Bad ine [sic] Estman was and she is usen [using] the tonic and others are usen [using] the tonick [tonic] and are well.[4] Well you want to now [know] about flowrs [flowers]. tha [they] are all in Bloom. Tha [they] are lovly [lovely]. The Canies [sic] is in Bloom now and the morning gloers [glories] is too nice all kinds of flowers. I have caned [canned] 25 cans of all kinds and will can that meny [many] more.

Graps [grapes] is not ripe yet and tha [they] are plenty. i [sic] will tell you what we have peches [peaches] and Caleitch [sic] and tatoes [sic] and sweet taters plenty. i have cooke [cooked] jam, sewt [sweet] corn and Beens [sic] and tomates [tomatoes] and mangoes no appy [sic]. Pap went to them Dutch folks Bergley ware [where] we stoped [stopped]. i am alone. i will go to mises [misses] Cfinery [sic] and sta [stay] all night. i think you had Better come home soon. Come on the Expres [express train] for the smith farm is lonesome i herd [heard] and Com [come] soon. Maryl [sic] said she would send you money to come home. new come and have Some pleshure [pleasure] wenn [when] you can. this month is the first the nabors [neighbors] are well. you must think hard of me for not righten [writing] sooner for pap and me was at west lebnon [Lebanon] 2 weeks. Pople [people] are all well. we came home.

friday. We went to a sale and Bught [bought] a Bed sted [sic] and a quilting fraim [frame] so you can work when you come home soon. pap sends his best wishes to all. pap cant right [write] now for his hands is so Bad he cant right [write]. I hurt much time to right [write]. pleas [please] anser [answer] soon and why don’t Refenia[5] right [write] and what is she doing [doing] and why don’t gusta[6] right [write].She told pap she wold [would] right [write] and what is mgy[7] Dooing [doing]. Well i must tell you that i have another spice in my frindshoft [sic]. Your Cousen [cousin] frank wolf married a spice. Refina she should right [write] and argret [sic] ihave so much to Doo [do]. i don’t know [know] whare [where] to cmense [commense]. sweet corn to drie [dry] and Beens peaches to can and Drie [dry] and Doo [do] I have oald [sic] frute [fruit] caned [canned] a lot yet

Don’t [sic] what regina will Doo she may want sum [some] cans of frute [fruit]. i must no [know]. Regina pleas [please] and get that little Black Dog whare [where] Refina and Ray[8] had the on whare [where] pap giv [give] to ray [sic] and send it in for pap. he [sic] will pay the Expres [sic] on it. Pap told Refenia if tha [they] Did not want it she send it to him. you [sic] sa [say] why will you why. when he went pedaling[9] he took it along and it still watched him and wold [would] bark if som [some] one wold [would] com [come]. get it soon and Expres [sic] it to Burton City Wayne Co Ohio. there is another Burton.

morning of the 4th. well I slept at Cofmans. rested well. hoping you are well and all the rest nabors [neighbors] wishs [sic] you well and a speedy rturn [return]. Best wishes of all the nabors [neighbors] all. the Coffman girl roat [wrote] to you. Did you anser [answer]. well i must tell you that Ole Maxhimer has Canser [sic] on her brest [sic] and she wants us to right [write] to her. well i must go and get my milk for pap is not here. i wish you was here to help us get them wild chers [cherries] a corse [across] the Road. Th [sic] are nice and good. i am Baking Bread and pachs [peaches] and Elder Beries [berries]. plenty work all my self. Pap cant [sic] help me. his hands is so Bad the one finger has no bone in it. Feels so and is all cruket [crooked] Bt [but] will Doo [do] the Best we can. children som [some] times i crie [cry] for we are alone. god [sic] will car [care] for us. Tell the wrest [rest] right [write] soon. anser [answer] soon E. B. Gruissy
now pleas [please] and Doo [do] get soon it will please him to think that you care for him. if you get the little Black Dog put it in a small Crate [sic]. Ssend it soon pleas [please]. Well mises [sic] Breneman sends her Best wishes to you and said you should Com [come] home soon froam [from] mother to Dauters [daughters]. anser [answer] soon
Esther B Gruissy

Tell the Willes[10] and Seth[11] pap said if tha [they] want eny [any] Medsen [medicine] tha [they] shouldand he will send only tha [they] shal [shall] pay the Expres [sic] Charges. wo [who] Could Doo [do] eny [any] more. well i got my milk and to Day [today] the Butcher coms [comes] and i will get some prest [pressed] ham for my self to Eat and som [some] meat too. Anser [answer] soon
Esther B Gruissy






[1] Willis Nichols [1869 OH – 1940 MI] husband of Rephenia Gruissy. At the time the letter was written Regina was visiting her sister and brother in law.
[2] Seth Benner Morrison [1861 PA – 1952 OH] husband of Margaret Jane Gruissy. His wife was the half-sister of Regina.
[3] Augustus Ceaser Gruissy [1840 OH – 1915 OH] was married three times. Esther B Wolf was his second wife. He was 61 when this letter was written.
[4] Augustus grew herbs and made & sold medicines.
[5] Rephenia (Gruiss) Nichols [1870 OH – 1943 MI], daughter of Augustus Gruissy & Esther B Wolf.
[6] Emily Augusta Morrison [b 1888 OH], daughter of Seth B Morrison & Margaret Jane Gruissy.
[7] Possibly  ‘Maggy’ Margaret Jane (Gruissy) Morrison [1861 OH – 1946 OH].
[8] Richard Ray Nichols [b 1886 OH], son of Willis Nichols & Rephenia C Gruissy.
[9] Augustus pedaled his medicines door to door.
[10] The Willis Nichols family
[11] The Seth Morrison family