Sunday, March 30, 2014

Sunday Obituary – Fletcher B Brumfield, Farmer in MS

‘Mr. Brumfield funeral service held Tuesday’



Funeral services for Fletcher Boyd Brumfield, 85 year old retired farmer, were held Tuesday, Dec 13 at Ginn Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Roy Fullove assisted by the Rev. Robert Ledbetter officiating. Pallbearers were Robert Lee, Pat Brumfield, John E.Brumfield, Tommy Brumfield, Joe Reid Brumfield, and Pope Dykes.

Mr. Brumfield was born June 28, 1875 in Ole Pike county – the son of Alex Brumfield and Martha Alford Brumfield. He has lived in the Silver Creek community all of his life. Survivors include his wife and four children: Mead Brumfield, Mrs. Bernard Rocketts, Lake Charles, La.; Mrs. Gordon Rushing and Charles Edward Brumfield’ two sisters: Sally Brumfield and Mrs. Daisy Alford, 6 grandchildren and one great grandchild.
Internment was in Silver Creek cemetery with Ginn Funeral home in charge.





From: Magee, Zuma Fendlason. Selected Obituaries from Louisiana (Washington & Tangipahoa Parishes) and from Mississippi (Pike, Walthall & Marion Counties). Volume I. Franklinton, Louisiana: Privately printed, 1976. From Franklinton Library, LA.



1 Fletcher Boyd Brumfield b: 28 Jun 1875 MS, d: 11 Dec 1960 MS
... + Mattie Burmfield b: 02 Mar 1880 MS, m: Abt. 1908, d: 08 Oct 1967
......2 Mead Brumfield b: c. 1913 MS
......2 Francis Brumfield b: c. 1916 MS
...... + Bernard Rocketts
......2 Courtney Jane Brumfield b: c. 1919 MS
...... + Gordon Rushing
......2 Ed H. Brumfield b: c. 1924 MS

Related Posts:








Thursday, March 27, 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday – Belleek from Ireland

My New Year’s resolution for genealogy is to photograph and label the family treasures in our house. I want our children to know something about these treasures when we are no longer here to remind them where each candlestick and teapot and bowl have come from.


 Belleek Bowl


It is March and the sun is shining in our back porch and the right time to begin. So I took my camera and some delicate Belleek pieces out to the sunshine for photographs.

This three footed bowl, probably a sugar bowl, has the ‘Third Mark’ on the bottom showing that it was made between 1926 & 1946. I have been searching on the internet to find more details about the Belleek pieces I have inherited. I hope to discover more about this small bowl.

This bowl was owned by my great aunt, Kathleen G Coyle. I am sure she bought each of her Belleek pieces during her visits to Ireland to visit her Mullane family.



Belleek Marks

This is a poster I photographed when I visited the Belleek Store in Ireland in 2012. 
It shows the various marks that help to date their pieces.

Related Posts:






Tuesday, March 25, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #12; Mary Jo Mullane ; Believer in Dreams



This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we “write once a week about a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, a research problem — any that focuses on that one ancestor.” 



I have decided to begin with my grandparents and to work back through the generations. My mother was not able to meet this grandmother of hers. Mary Jo was looking forward to her first grandchild’s birth and bought a little bracelet for the upcoming baby. However, Mary Jo died in December and my mother was born in March.



Mary Josephine Mullane Coyle
3 Aug 1867 Ireland – 17 December 1927 NY
My Great Grandmother
Mary Josephine Mullane Coyle

MaryJosephine Mullane was the daughter of Daniel Mullane & Brigid English. She was the oldest of 11 children. Of those 11 these siblings grew to adulthood: Timothy, Ellen, Frances, Daniel & Julia. The family lived in Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland.

In 1885 Mary Jo and her cousin Mary Pollack traveled to Queenstown/Cobh and boarded the SS Britannic for a journey to the United States. They arrived in New York City on 25 May 1885.[1],[2]

In New York City, Mary Jo met Michael Coyle, son of Patrick Coyle & Margaret Brady, when they were in the same boarding house. She was walking down a flight of stairs and he was starting up those stairs. She thought he was very handsome. He saw her and instantly fell in love.[3] They were married on 9 November, 1895 by Father Patrick F. McSweeny, the pastor at Saint Brigid’s Church.

My grandmother was the oldest of Mary Jo’s 7 children. Helen was born 9 January 1897.[4] The next child, Francis Patrick, died as a toddler. Mary Jo had four more daughters and another son.

On 2 June 1900 a Federal Census taker visited the little Coyle family at their home at 159 113th Street in Manhattan. The enumerator listed Michael as a baker in a bake shop. Mary Jo was listed as a mother of three children; two living. Their daughters were listed as Nellie and Mary. [5] In 1910 they were renting an apartment on Third Avenue. Michael was still working as a baker. Mary Jo was the mother of five; four living.[6]

Mary Jo kept in touch with her family in Ireland. In September 1910 two of Mary Jo’s siblings arrived for a visit.  Timothy Mullane was 36 years old.  He was a laborer in Ireland. Ellen Mullane was 39 years old and a servant in Ireland. [7] In February 1914 the Coyles got another visit from Mary Jo’s sister, Ellen Mullane.[8]

Michael and Mary Jo’s children continued to grow. Mary Jo always remembered her first son, Francis.  She would take Lillian and Kathleen  to visit their brother’s grave at St. Raymond’s Cemetery in the Bronx.   They would take a picnic lunch because the trip would take most of the day.  Kathleen remembered taking three different trolleys to get there. Mary Jo would carry a little bouquet of forget-me-nots to place on her son’s grave.  She’d sit under a large oak tree and pray.  The little girls would sing and dance among the graves.   Kathleen thought of the cemetery as a fun place and not morbid at all.  It was just a place to visit her brother; a brother who had died 17 years before she was born. One night, Mary Jo had a dream.  In the dream, a man came and spoke to her.  He said she had been visiting the wrong grave.  The next day, Mary Jo took her youngest child by the hand and walked to the trolley for the long trip to the cemetery.  She went straight to the office. Mary Jo asked about the location of Francis’ grave.  His grave had no headstone.  Headstones were very expensive.  The gentleman in the office led Mary Jo and Billie to the spot where Francis was buried.  Mary Jo had, indeed, been visiting the wrong grave site.  She bent over and placed delicate forget-me-nots on the right spot.  She sat down and prayed silently. [9]

The 1920 Census is important in the history of the Coyle family because it is the only census to show the whole family: Michael, Mary Jo and their six living children, ages 23 to 3 years old. Michael was still a baker.[10] By the 1925 NYS census their oldest daughter was married.[11]

Dreams and intuition have always had an important role in our family.  In 1920, Mary Jo had a strange feeling about her mother, Brigid English Mullane.  According to Kathleen, her mother sometimes had these feelings about things that were about to happen.  Mary Jo thought her mother was ill.  In May 1920 she applied for a U. S. Passport.  On the application she said she intended to go to Ireland to “visit my mother.” The passport photo of Mary Jo included daughters Lillian and Kathleen who were to accompany her. The passport described Mary Jo: 4’ 10” tall; high forehead, blue eyes; brown hair; fair complexion; and a round face. She planned on leave on 24 July 1920 on the vessel Celtic. [12]  She packed a trunk with everything she would need for herself and “the kids”.  Mary Jo, Lillian and Kathleen headed by ship to Ireland.[13] When the trio arrived in Clonmel, Mary Jo found her mother in good health.  Relieved, they settled in for a good visit.  Just months after they returned to their New York City home, Mary Jo received word that her mother died.  Brigid English Mullane died 28 November 1920. Mary Jo’s premonitions had been correct after all.[14]

Mary Josephine died 17 December 1927.[15] Her death certificate gives Cardiac Respiratory Failure as the cause of death. My mother told me that Mary Jo’s health issues began with an infected tooth. Mary Jo’s youngest daughter was just 11 years old. On 20 December she was buried at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery.[16] The funeral, including a solid oak casket, a hearse, 2 auto coaches, opening the grave, embalming and flowers, cost $564.65.[17]




[1] New York Passenger Lists 1820 - 1957, Microfilm #M237-486; S. S. Britannic, arrival 25 May 1885; Passengers: Mary Mullane & Mary A. Pollack.
[2] Castle Garden Web Site. Ship: Britannic; Arrived 25 May 1885. Port: Liverpool & Queenstown; Mary Mullane.
[3] Interview with Kathleen Coyle [daughter of Michael], January 2006.
[4] Certificate and Record of Birth; 1897; City of New York Department of Health, State of NY, Manhattan, #2566: Nellie Coyle, born 9 Jan 1897.
[5] 1900 United States Census, Manhattan, New York; Vol. 178, E. D. 930, Sheet 2, Line 72; NYS Library, Albany, NY; Microfilm Box #120.  Michael Coyle family at 159 E 113 Street, Manhattan. 
[6] 1910 US Census, Third Avenue, Ward 12, Manhattan, NY City, NY, S. D. 1, E. D. 330, Sheets 16 A & B. Michael Coyle family.
[7] New York Passenger Lists 1820 – 1957, S. S. Oceanic from Queenstown, Ireland to New York, September 1910.
[8] New York Passenger Lists 1820 - 1957, microfilm #T715-2260; S. S. Oceanic, page 115, February 1914. Ellen Mullane.
[9] Interview with Kathleen G. Coyle, August 2000.
[10] 1920 US Census, New York City, NY, Vol. 279, E. D. 1292, Sheet 18, Line 70; NYS Library, Albany, NY.  Michael Coyle family, 223 E 113th.
[11] 1925 New York State Census, New York Co, Microfilm Box #151, AD 18, ED 32, Page 47, NYS Library, Albany, NY.  Michael Coyle family at 223 E 113th.
[12] 1925 New York State Census, New York Co, Microfilm Box #151, AD 18, ED 32, Page 47, NYS Library, Albany, NY.  Michael Coyle family at 223 E 113th.
[13] Interview with Kathleen G. Coyle, August 2000.
[14] Pedigree Chart for Kathleen Coyle prepared by Kathleen Coyle.
[15] Certificate of Death for Mary Josephine Coyle, 17 December 1927, certificate #8271; State of New York, Dept. of Health of the City of New York, Bureau of Records.
[16] May 1993 letter from : The Trustees of St. Patrick's Cathedral; Gate of Heaven Cemetery; Stevens Avenue; Hawthorne; NY; 10532.
[17] Receipt for burial of Mary J. Coyle, from John J. Meagher, General Furnishing Undertaker and Licensed Embalmer (3483 Third Avenue, New York City), 20 December 1927.

Monday, March 24, 2014

Motivational Monday; The National Genealogy Society Conference


I am very motivated! I have registered to attend the 
 in Richmond, VA in May! 
Can’t wait to learn more about genealogy from experts in the field! Is there a better reason to get motivated to improve & extend my genealogy skills & knowledge?



And that’s not all! Fellow blogger & genealogy friend, Wendy from Jollett Etc. will also be attending! We are making plans to meet in person. We have been in contact for some time now & it will be wonderful to share a cup of tea or lunch & talk about our conference experiences. We'll meet on Friday morning at the session about the Virginia Militia, saving seats like high school days. Wendy says it will be cool to blog about the conference & connecting up! She’s right! Ha! You'll have to watch both our blogs for our posts. Cheri from Carolina Girl Genealogy & I are also comparing schedules to see if we can meet up. Anyone else want to join us?

Meanwhile, I have been looking over the long list of sessions. Categories of lectures include: Methodology, Migration, Records, State Research, Virginia, Irish, Tricks & Tips, Online Resources, Libraries, & BCG Skill building. It was hard to choose. I read through the list three times before starting my selection. I feel like a child selecting treats in a candy shop.

Virginia Research. Because I have ancestors from Virginia I plan to attend several Virginia research sessions including:
·         The Virginia Historical Society
·         Are Those My Early Virginia Ancestors?
·         The Virginia Militia
·         Researching a Civil War Soldier in Virginia


Other Southern Research. I also want to attend these to research other southern ancestors:
·         Records of the Southern Historical Society
·         North Carolina Research
·         South Carolina Research
·         Hidden in Plain Sight: Tracking Pioneers on the Old SW Frontier before Statehood
·         Carolinians Settle the South

Research & Skills selections. I hope to attend these to improve my skills:
·         An Inside Look at How Ancestry DNA Can Take Your Search even Further
·         Oh, the Things You Can Map: Mapping Data, Memory & Historical Context
·         The Next Generation of NGS Learning
·         Where Would You Go if You Had Five Days in Washington, D.C.?
·         Writing to Engage Your Reader
·         Researching an Ancestor’s Career
·         Sharing Family Stories
·         Organizing Your Research without Losing Your Mind


There are also social events. I plan to attend the First Timers Breakfast & a luncheon on the topic, How to Assemble a Weighty Genealogical Tome and Survive the Experience. I also want to visit the Exhibit Hall where there will be nearly 100 vendors, heritage societies, professional and educational organizations.

Be sure to download the NGS 2014 App to track your sessions, see a map & a list of vendors & find friends there. Thanks to Cheri for letting me know about that.

Motivated? Yes, I am!


Manassas Battlefield National Park VA




Monday, March 17, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #11; Michael Coyle; Proud to be Irish

This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we “write once a week about a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, a research problem — any that focuses on that one ancestor.” 



Happy St. Patrick's Day!
It is the perfect day to post about my Irish great grandfather; a man whose life is surrounded with questions.



Michael Coyle
b 24 Nov 1870 Ireland
My Great Grandfather
Mary Jo Mullane & Michael Coyle

Although I do not know details of Michael’s death I do know something about his birth. Michael Coyle was the oldest child of Patrick Coyle & Margaret Brady. He was born in Moat, Cavan, Ireland.[1] He was baptized on 26 November.[2] He would be the oldest of 11 children. His siblings were: Bernard, Catherine, Maria, Patrick, Margaret, Thomas, James, Bridget, Maryanne & William.

For unknown reasons Michael did not stay in Ireland long. He was only 14 years old when he boarded the boat Servia and sailed for New York City, landing on 11 May 1885.[3] He became an American citizen in October 1894.[4],[5]

In New York City, Michael Coyle met Mary Josephine Mullane, daughter of Daniel Mullane and Brigid English, while they were both in a boarding house. She was walking down a flight of stairs and he was starting up those stairs. She thought he was very handsome. He saw her and instantly fell in love.[6] Despite the protests of Michael’s mother, they were married on 9 November, 1895 by Father Patrick F. McSweeny, the pastor at Saint Brigid’s Church.

On 2 June 1900 a Federal Census taker visited the little Coyle family at their home at 159 113th Street in Manhattan. The enumerator listed Michael as a baker in a bake shop. Mary Jo was listed as a mother of three children; two living. Their daughters were listed as Nellie and Mary. [7] In 1910 they were renting an apartment on Third Avenue. Michael was still working as a baker. Mary Jo was the mother of five; four living.[8]

Michael was proud of his American citizenship. He kept his naturalization papers in a safe deposit box in a bank. He was also proud of his Irish birth. Each year on St. Patrick’s Day he would open the windows on their apartment, play Irish songs on their piano and sing loudly. Mary Jo would complain at the noise. Michael would say, 'I want people to know we are Irish'. His wife would say, 'I think they know already'.[9]

The 1920 Census is important in the history of the Coyle family because it is the only census to show the whole family: Michael, Mary Jo and their six living children, ages 23 to 3 years old. Michael was still a baker.[10] By the 1925 NYS census their oldest daughter was married.[11]

By the end of 1927 Mary Jo had died, Michael had left his family and the single daughters were living together. I have been unable to discover where Michael went or when he died.

Interested in Irish research? Check the long list of resources at my web site,


Related Posts:





[1] Birth Record for Michael Coyle, 26 November 1870, Microfilm #101217, Page 121, Entry 478, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.  Photocopy from Kathleen Coyle, Arizona.
[2] Baptism Record for Patrick Coyle, 9 May 1841, Microfilm #1279229, Church Records of Ballymachugh Parish, Page 30 (British Isles) from Family History Library. Photocopy of page given to author by Kathleen G. Coyle, Sun City West, Arizona and by Robert Coyle, Florence, Oregon.
[3] Arrivals at Port of New York, Microfilm #1027354, arrival 11 May 1885, Passenger #540, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Copy made by Robert J. Coyle and given to author. Passenger: Michael Coyle.
[4] Citizenship Papers for Michael Coyle, 21 October 1894, State of Connecticut, County of New London. Photocopy belonged to Kathleen G. Coyle (daughter of Michael), Sun City West, Arizona.
[5] Certificate of Citizenship for Michael Coyle, 25 Oct 1894, USA, State of CT; Co of New London; New London, CT.
[6] Interview with Kathleen Coyle [daughter of Michael], January 2006.
[7] 1900 United States Census, Manhattan, New York; Vol. 178, E. D. 930, Sheet 2, Line 72; NYS Library, Albany, NY; Microfilm Box #120.  Michael Coyle family at 159 E 113 Street, Manhattan. 
[8] 1910 US Census, Third Avenue, Ward 12, Manhattan, NY City, NY, S. D. 1, E. D. 330, Sheets 16 A & B. Michael Coyle family.
[9] Interview with Kathleen Coyle [daughter of Michael], January 2006.
[10] 1920 United States Census, New York City, NY, Vol. 279, E. D. 1292, Sheet 18, Line 70; NYS Library, Albany, NY. Michael Coyle family, 223 E 113th.
[11] 1925 NYS Census, NY Co, Microfilm Box #151, AD 18, ED 32, Page 47, NYS Library, Albany, NY.  Michael Coyle family at 223 E 113th.

Friday, March 14, 2014

Sepia Saturday - Domes


Half Dome, Yosemite, California

Domes are the focus of this week's Sepia Saturday. When I saw this I thought of the amazing cathedrals I saw in Spain & Portugal, Independence Hall in Philadelphia, beautiful Monticello in VA & the Biltmore in NC. I have visited & taken pictures of all these places. But then I thought of a dome that was not built by man, making it more beautiful because it is nature's beauty.



If you have not visited Yosemite & you are able, put it on your calendar!

Be sure to see more domes at Sepia Saturday.






Tuesday, March 11, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #10; Fannie Edelstein; From Austria to NYC


This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we “write once a week about a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, a research problem — any that focuses on that one ancestor.”

I have decided to begin with my grandparents and to work back through the generations. Here is one of my great grandparents.



Fannie Edelstein Gartner

Oct 1860 Austria – 28 February 1908 NY
My Great Grandmother

I’d love to tell an endearing story about my great grandmother, a woman born in Austria/Hungry who died when my grandfather was a young man. However, I know almost nothing about this ancestor. I do know that my grandfather kept her picture (above) on top of his dresser and it has been handed down to me.

On 24 March 1878 Fanny Edelstein married Leopold Gartner, son of Marcus S Gartner and Laura Harrn.[1] In 1880 they were living at 59 Pitt Street, New York City. Leopold was a tailor. They had one daughter.[2] In 1900 the family was in Manhattan. Fanny was the mother of 2 daughters and 3 sons.[3]

Between the 1900 US census & the 1905 NYS census, Leopold changed his surname from Gartner to Gardner. Leopold was still a tailor while Fanny did house work. Three of the children were employed: Florence, 20, was a clerk; Nathaniel, 19, was a telegrapher; Moses, 17, was also a telegrapher. Albert, 15 was at school. The youngest daughter is not listed.[4]

Fannie was probably a big part of the day on 27 January 1907 when her oldest daughter, Florence, married Frank Samuel Weissberg, son of Morris & Rose Weissberg. She may have seen her oldest grandchild, Milton S Weissberg, born 27 December 1907 in Buffalo, NY. However, Fannie died soon after that. She died 28 February 1908. She is buried in Washington Cemetery, Kings, NY.[5]


Fannie, Leopold & Family:

1 Leopold Gartner b: Apr 1860 Austria, d: 13 Jun 1948 Buffalo, Erie, NY
... + Fannie Edelstein b: Oct 1860 Austria, m: 24 Mar 1878 Manhattan, NY, d: 28 Feb 1908 NY
......2 Florence Gartner b: May 1879 NY d: 19 Feb 1954 Buffalo, Erie, NY
...... + Frank Samuel Weissberg b: 26 Oct 1878 Austria, m: 27 Jan 1907 Manhattan, NY, d: 17 Dec 1940 Buffalo, Erie, NY
.........3 Milton Sydney Weisberg b: 27 Dec 1907 Buffalo, Erie, NY, d: 7 Oct 1987 Buffalo, NY
......... + Anne Bloom b: 29 Jan 1912 Buffalo, Erie, NY, m: 26 Dec 1937 Buffalo, Erie, NY
.........3 Francis Weisberg b: 02 Feb 1915 Buffalo, Erie, NY
......2 Nathaniel J. Gardner b: 21 Jul 1882 NY, d: 7 Dec 1944 Germantown, Columbia, NY
...... + Helen F Coyle b: 9 Jan 1897 NY, m: 9 May 1921 Manhattan, NY d: 13 Oct 1965 NY
.........3 Alberta Joy Gardner b: 26 Mar 1928 Bronx, Bronx, NY, d: 10 Aug 1992 Albany, NY
......... + Delbert K Brown b: 27 Jul 1928 Wayne, OH, m: 8 Aug 1948 NY, d: 24 Oct 2000, NY
......2 Arthur Moses Gartner b: 15 Jun 1884 NY, d: Aft. 1948
...... + Frances
......2 Albert Gartner b: 11 Dec 1888, d: Abt. 1921
......2 Anna Gartner b: Nov 1891, d: Aft. 1940
...... + Benjamin H. Bearman b: Abt. 1882

Related Posts:



[1] Marriage Record for Leopold Gartner and Fanny Edelstein, 24 March 1878, Manhattan, New York, New York Marriages 1686 - 1980, Microfilm #1562246, Family Search.org.
[2] 1880 US Census,New York,  New York City; Vol.50, E.D. 143, Sheet 36; Line 44; New York State Library, Albany, NY, Microfilm Box #69; Leopold Gartner at 59 Pitt Street;  Leopold Gartner Family at 59 Pitt Street, NYC.
[3] 1900 US Census, New York,  Manhattan; Vol.169, E.D. 804, Sheet 16; Line 64; New York State Library, Albany, NY; Leopold Gartner family at 445 East 83rd Street.
[4] 1905 New York State Census, New York County, Manhattan; ED 13, AD 30, Block A, Page 8; Louis Gardner family on East 87th Street.
[5] Certificate of Death for Fannie Gardner, 28 February 1908, #7039; State of New York, City of New York Department of Health.