Tuesday, August 19, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #33; Abraham Mark, Master Carpenter

This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we write once a week about a specific ancestor. I began with my grandparents and am working my way back in time.


Abraham Mark
12 November 1812 PA – 7 April 1872 OH
My 3x Great Grandfather


My paternal grandmother[1] and her siblings[2], [3] all pointed to Abraham Mark as their paternal grandfather. They knew dates & places. However, no one knew his parents. I have strong sources leading me to Abraham but the Mark line stops there.

Abraham Mark married Mary Isabella Heffeflinger. Both were born in Pennsylvania but were living in Wayne Co., Ohio when they were married on 21 February 1839.[4], [5] My grand uncle Clarence Mark claimed Abraham had a log cabin where the Wooster Court House now stands.[6]

Abraham and Mary Isabella remained in Wayne Co., OH for the rest of their lives, raising eight sons. They can be found there in a long list of census reports as their family grows. In 1860 Abraham is shown as a ‘master carpenter’.[7]

 Four of their sons served in the Civil War: Thomas Jefferson Mark, John Mark, William Mark & Marion Mark. Two did not return. John Mark died in December 1862 and Thomas Jefferson Mark died a month later, in January 1863.[8]

In 1870 Abraham and Mary Isabella had three sons still living at home and attending school: Franklin, David & Edwin. Their real estate was valued at $1,600 & personal estate at $500.[9]

W. C. Moore, MD was the family’s physician for many years. He treated Abraham frequently for spinal trouble, trouble with his Kidneys, and rheumatism. His "frequent ailments were so severe as to finally disable him entirely."[10] Abraham died 7 April 1872 from ‘lung fever’.[11] He is buried in Reedsburg Cemetery.[12]



Related Posts:



[1] Diary of Ivy Mark Brown, copy in possession of author.
[2] Interview with Clarence Mark; July 1993, in Greenville, Ohio; Information on the Abraham Mark family.
[3] Mark, Bertha Flickinger. Genealogy of William Mark Family, 1844 – 1965, privately printed.
[4] Marriage Record for Abraham Mark and Mary Isabella Heffelfinger, 21 February 1839, Volume 4A, Page 253, Wayne County Marriage Records, Wayne County Public Library, Wooster, Ohio.
[5] Smith, Richard G.. Seventy-Five Years of Wayne County, Ohio Marriages 1813 - 1888. Wayne County Genealogical Society, 1979.  Page 58. Abraham Marks & Mary Isabella Heffelfinger 21 Feb 1839
From Wayne County Public Library.
[6] Interview with Clarence Mark; July 1993, in Greenville, Ohio; Information on the Abraham Mark family.
[7] 1860 U. S. Census, Wayne County, Ohio; 1860; ; Page 150, Lines 14-22; Family History Center Microfilm #805051; NOTES: Abraham Marks Family in Congress Twp., Taken 17 Aug 1860. Abraham "Marks".
[8] Pension Report of John Marks; 1861-1883; National Archives Civil War Pension Report, Ohio Volunteers, Co.C. 16th Regiment, filed by mother, Isabelle Marks, Box #35175, Bundle #7.
[9] 1870 Federal Census, Wayne County, Ohio; 1870; Volume 60 (1-244); Page 19, Line 1 ; Family History Center Microfilm #552779; Notes: A. Mark Family in Congress Township.
[10] Pension Report of John Marks; 1861-1883; National Archives Civil War Pension Report, Ohio Volunteers, Co.C. 16th Regiment, filed by mother, Isabelle Marks, Box #35175, Bundle #7.
[11] Death Record for Abraham Marks, 7 April 1872, Volume 1, page 38, Wayne County Probate Court, Court House, 107 W Liberty St., Wooster, Ohio.
[12] Genealogical Section of the Wayne County Historical Society. Wayne County, Ohio Burial Records. Ohio: Privately printed, Page 562; Plain Township, Reedsburg Cemetery. MARK: Abraham d. 4 - 7 - 1872, age 60 y 5 m 28 d.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Sunday Obituary – Seletia Smith 1850 - 1902


Wife of William L Smith Dies

"Seletia E. Smith, wife of W. L. Smith, was born June 9th, 1850, united with the Baptist Church April, 1867, died January 16th, 1902. She leaves a husband, six children, four brothers, four sisters … She was a member of Centerville Baptist Church at the time of her death. Her funeral service was conducted by Eld. W. J. Fortinberry."


From: Williams, E. Russ. Abstracts of Obituaries from the Minutes of the Magee's Creek Baptist Association (Mississippi and Louisiana), 1882 - 1924. Monroe, Louisiana: Privately printed, 1978, page 57. From the Louisiana Archives, Baton Rouge, LA.



1 Seletia E b: 09 Jun 1852, d: 16 Jan 1902 MS
... + William L. Smith b: 06 Apr 1845 MS, d: 15 Apr 1928 MS
......2 Kelly Smith b: 22 Aug 1873, d: 21 Mar 1885 MS
......2 Emily O. Smith b: 19 May 1876, d: 23 Mar 1879 MS

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Saturday, August 16, 2014

Sepia Saturday: World War I Sweetheart Letter

This week's topic at Sepia Saturday is Letters Home. The photos shows soldiers diligently writing home. I just had to add to the collection not because I have a photo of a soldier to share but because I have a World War I letter written by a soldier.  This letter was not written to Mother & Father. It was written to a sweetheart.








This letter was written 
15 November 1918
by 
Private Herman L. Englander: HQrs Co. 358th Infantry: Amr. Exp. Forces, France.

It was written to my maternal grandmother, Helen F. Coyle.

I'd love to hear from someone related to the soldier.

I will share the full text of the letter in a future blog post.

Friday, August 15, 2014

Friday Funny - Take a Seat



I found the perfect garden bench for the genealogist! 
Sit & relax with a book of family history or gather the family around the bench for photos.

Recently my daughter & I went to the College of Dupage, Illinois to see an exhibit at the Cleve Carney Art Gallery. We saw this bench in the garden and I had to snap a photo to share with other genealogists.


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Tuesday, August 12, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #32; Martha P Smith in SC & MS

This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we write once a week about a specific ancestor. I began with my grandparents and am working my way back in time.



Martha P Smith Alford
25 March 1802 SC – 8 August 1861 MS
My 3x Great Grandmother




Martha was the daughter of Jeremiah Smith & Joanna Dillon.[1] Her siblings were: Hollander, Eli, Jane, Edwin, Wyatt, Eliza, Calvin, Lidda, Mehala, Milevey, Joanna & Jeremiah. Her brother, Wyatt Smith is also my 3x great grandparent. Therefore Martha & Wyatt’s parents are my Double 4x great grandparents!

Martha married Edwin Barksdale Alford, son of Jacob Alford & Elizabeth Bryant, on 20 December 1818 in Pike, MS.[2],[3] In 1820 they were in Pike, MS with a young son.[4] They would stay in the area and become the parents of 13 children.

A grandchild wrote:
Grandmother was a well-chosen wife for him. Married at the age of sixteen years, she was mother before she was eighteen, had twelve children, all of whom lived to be grown except one that died in infancy.[5]

Two of Martha’s brothers lived near Martha & Edwin. Wyatt Smith & Calvin Smith also lived in in the Simmonsville & Progress area.[6]  The 1850 Census report shows Edwin as a 58 year old farmer. Martha still had 5 children at home. Sons, Jeptha and Seaborn were farm hands.[7] 
           
Martha & Edwin are buried in the Edwin B. Alford Cemetery. The small cemetery is on a gravel road, one and one-half miles southwest of Silver Springs Baptist Church and 3/4 mile north of the Louisiana line.  "Martha Smith Wife of Edwin B. Alford BORN Mar. 25, 1802 DIED Aug. 8, 1861".[8]  It is directly by the roadside on a small hill.  Visiting the cemetery in August 1997, it was difficult to see the gravestones from just a short distance away because of the weeds and brush grown up all around and through the site. 

Related Post:



[1] Holbrook and Fressenden’s Stereotype Edition of the Holy Bible, Brattleboro, VT, 1825. Original owner: Jeremiah Smith Sr. of Pike Co., MS. Copied by Texana Carter, 27 August 1854. In possession of Mrs. W C Uhlman, Rte 6, Tylertown, MS, great granddaughter. Copy given to author by Pat (Brock) Smith.
[2] Pedigree Chart for Roy Brown; 1700's to 1948; Compiled by Zelda Marie Alford Fortenberry; Given to author, June 1994, by Rayleen Brown Hall.
[3] Heard, Ruby Alford, Gil Alford. "Early Mississippi Alfords." AAFA Action: The Official Publication of the Alford American Family Association III (1990):p. 36.
[4] Heard, Ruby Alford, Gil Alford. "Early Mississippi Alfords." AAFA Action: The Official Publication of the Alford American Family Association III (1990):p. 36.
[5] Tynes, Walter Edwin. My Pilgrimage, 1928.
[6] Land & Maps. Boyd, Gregory A. Family Maps of Pike County, Mississippi. Deluxe. Norman, Oklahoma: Arphax Publishing Co., 2005.
[7] 1850 U. S. Census, Pike County, Mississippi.
[8] Parish, Ray and June Sartin. Cemetery Inscriptions, Pike County, Mississippi 1750 - 1978. Privately published.

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday - Bermuda Cedar


Wedding Cups from Bermuda

My husband & I took a cruise to Bermuda for our honeymoon in early June more than 3 decades ago. While we were on those beautiful islands we wanted to buy something that could be only be found in Bermuda and decided on a couple things made from Bermuda cedar. We bought wedding cups, wine glasses with double wedding rings around the stem, and a pair of bookends. The wooden cups were especially romantic because we had only been married a few days. We still keep these on shelves in our living room.

Cedar trees have significant cultural value to Bermudians. The wood of the Bermuda Cedar was historically valued for construction, ship building and furniture. It was also used for carving, boxes and firewood. The soft, red wood is still highly prized by woodworkers and the signature smell of cedar is known to most Bermudians. A Cedar seedling is often placed atop Bermudian wedding cakes to be planted by the couple.

Cedar Bookends

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Tuesday, August 5, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #31; Edwin Barksdale Alford

This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we write once a week about a specific ancestor. I began with my grandparents and am working my way back in time.


Edwin Barksdale Alford

25 November 1792 NC – 10 March 1878 MS
My 3x Great Grandfather


Edwin Barksdale Alford was the son of Jacob Alford. Jacob was married twice. Edwin was probably the son of Elizabeth Bryant. His siblings were: Lucy, Jacob, Needham J., Sarah,
 Nancy & Moses.[1],[2]

Edwin served in the War of 1812 as a private with Captain Thomas Bickman and the 12/13th Consolidated Louisiana Infantry.[3], [4] For his service he received a bounty land warrant for 40 acres of land in Tangipahoa Parish, LA. The warrant was signed by President Franklin Pierce.[5]

On 20 December 1818 Edwin married Martha Smith, daughter of Jeremiah Smith & Joanna Dillon. In 1820 they were in Pike, MS with a young son.[6] They would stay in the area and become the parents of 13 children.

A grandchild wrote:
My grandparents, Alford, were both remarkable strong characters. Well adapted to frontier life. Grandfather was one of the most practical and industrious men I have ever known. He began life as a poor farm boy. When he was a minor, he cleared and put in cultivation a field for a Mr. Bell, walking from home on the Bogue Chitto at the beginning of each week and returning at the end. In the course of his active life he had acquired some three or four thousand acres of land, some twenty or more negro slaves. He had bought the settlements of some half dozen improvident neighbors, worked from twelve to fifteen hours per day.  Had the best library of any man in the country at that time, and was remarkably well informed and a very public spirited citizen. Made all his moderate wealth directly out of the ground.[7]

The Alfords were abundant in the MS/LA area. Edwin held many land patents for Pike Co., MS & nearby Tangipahoa Parish, LA. In Pike Co. he had land patents in the Progress & Simmonsville area in 1849, 1851 & 1859. His neighbors included: Julius N Alford [his son]; Noah P Fortenberry, Hollis H Fortenberry, Wyatt Smith [wife's brother]; Calvin Smith [wife's brother]; and Gasua Fortenberry.[8] In Tangipahoa Parish his neighbors included: Ira P. Alford [his son], Isaac E. Alford, & Jeptha J Alford [his son].[9] There were 19 Alford households in Mississippi in 1840 and 45 Households in 1850.[10]

The 1850 Census report shows Edwin as a 58 year old farmer, married to Martha. The value of the real estate he owned was $2,000. Five children were at home. Sons, Jeptha and Seaborn were farm hands.[11] 

The 1870 Census lists several Alfords living next to each other: Julius, Edwin, Jacob and Frank. Edwin was 77, working as a farmer and living alone.  His land was valued at $1,000 and his personal estate at $500.[12] 
           
Edwin was buried in the Edwin B. Alford Cemetery. The small cemetery is on a gravel road, one and one-half miles southwest of Silver Springs Baptist Church and 3/4 mile north of the Louisiana line.  Also buried there are Martha Smith Alford, Julius Newton Alford and three or four unmarked graves.  Edwins stone is discolored but still easy to read: "Edwin B. Alford BORN Nov. 25, 1782 DIED Mar. 10, 1878".[13]  It is directly by the roadside on a small hill.  Visiting the cemetery in August 1997, it was difficult to see the gravestones from just a short distance away because of the weeds and brush grown up all around and through the site. 
 
Edwin B Alford


[1] Pedigree Chart for Roy Brown; 1700's to 1948; Compiled by Zelda Marie Alford Fortenberry; Given to author, June 1994, by Rayleen Brown Hall.
[2] Creel, Bevin J. A Patriot's Legacy: The Family of Richard Dillon and Ann Lawrence From Bertie County, North Carolina To Southern Mississippi and Louisiana. Franklinton, Louisiana: Privately Printed, 2002.
[3] Heard, Ruby Alford, Gil Alford. "Early Mississippi Alfords." AAFA Action: The Official Publication of the Alford American Family Association III (1990):p. 36.
[4] Family Note from Gilbert K. Alford, President of the Alford American Family Association.  March 1998. 
[5] Land. Bounty Land Warrant #75733 for Edwin Alford in Tangipahoa Parish, LA; 12 February 1857; US Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records. 
[6] Heard, Ruby Alford, Gil Alford. "Early Mississippi Alfords." AAFA Action: The Official Publication of the Alford American Family Association III (1990):p. 36.
[7] Tynes, Walter Edwin. My Pilgrimage, 1928.
[8] Land & Maps. Boyd, Gregory A. Family Maps of Pike County, Mississippi. Deluxe. Norman, Oklahoma: Arphax Publishing Co., 2005.
[9] Land & Maps. Boyd, Gregory A. Family Maps of Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana. Deluxe. Norman, Oklahoma: Arphax Publishing Co., 2008.
[10] Heard, Ruby Alford, Gil Alford. "Early Mississippi Alfords, Part 2." AAFA Action: The Official Publication of the Alford American Family Association IV, Number 1 (1991): p. 22.
[11] 1850 U. S. Census, Pike County, Mississippi.
[12] 1870 U.S. Census, Osyka, Pike County, Mississippi, Page 2.
[13] Parish, Ray and June Sartin. Cemetery Inscriptions, Pike County, Mississippi 1750 - 1978. Privately published.